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DIABETES
Type I diabetes accounts for about 5% of all diabetes cases. Type I, also known as “insulin-dependent” diabetes, occurs primarily in children and young adults. This form of diabetes results when a person’s immune system destroys the insulin-producing beta cells by mistake. Once the insulin-producing ß-cells have been lost, the person loses the ability to make sufficient amounts of insulin and diabetes results.
Type II diabetes, which accounts for 90-95% of all diabetes cases, occurs when a patient's ß-cells are unable to produce enough insulin to compensate for the insulin resistance that has developed and matured in various tissues and organs in their bodies, including muscle, liver and surrounding organs.

We are pursuing the creation and development of compounds that are capable of enlarging the population of ß-cells present in diabetic patients, thereby reducing their overall therapeutic requirements. The goal is to reduce or eliminate their dependence upon insulin injections altogether by substituting insulin with an orally active medicine that is more effective, less expensive, and easier to administer than supplemental insulin injections.

Based upon experimental research beyond the scope of this general discussion, HPRL believes that compounds capable of stimulating the certain proteins present in ß-cells will result in the regeneration (i.e. re-growth) of residual beta cells that remain present in diabetic patients. Such compounds may also stimulate precursor cells to differentiate into ß-cells. Once such cells are stimulated to grow to a sufficient extent, we believe that the diabetic patient’s symptoms will resolve and normal control of blood sugar will resume.
Type I Diabetes
Type II Diabetes
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